Super User

Super User

November 29, 2021

Marissa Grondin

Project Status: Active

Web update: May 5, 2022

The Rideau Valley Conservation Authority (RVCA) has completed a hazard mapping study for Stevens Creek from Malakoff Road to the Rideau River in the City of Ottawa.

These maps have been traditionally known as “floodplain mapping” or “regulation mapping” and they show areas that are prone to natural hazards such as flooding, erosion and natural environment features such as wetlands. 

When completed, the mapping will be used by the City of Ottawa when updating their Official Plan and Zoning Schedules and in the review of development applications under the Planning Act. RVCA will also use the mapping to guide the review of development applications submitted under the Development, Interference with Wetlands and Alterations to Shorelines and Watercourses Regulation.

Public consultation on the draft hazard mapping study for Stevens Creek from Malakoff Road to the Rideau River will continue until April 29, 2022. Virtual public consultation began late November 2021. Affected landowners were notified by mail and staff have been responding to inquiries by telephone calls, e-mail, virtual meetings, small group in-person meetings and site visits. In some cases the draft mapping has been refined based on site-specific information.

With the recent easing of provincial COVID-19 restrictions, the RVCA is now able to host an in-person presentation and question and answer session to provide an additional opportunity for public consultation.

Thursday, April 21, 2022
Alfred Taylor Recreation Centre
2300 Community Way, North Gower
Doors Open at 6:00 p.m.
Presentation begins at 6:15 p.m.
Question & Answer Period to follow

Anyone unable to attend can contact an RVCA Resource at 613-692-3571, toll-free at 1-800-267-3504 or by email at

This study is just one of several ongoing hazard mapping studies taking place in the watershed. For a complete list on ongoing work, click here.

 

    OTTAWA, November 23, 2021 — The Rideau Valley Conservation Authority (RVCA) is asking for public input on a new hazard mapping study for Stevens Creek in the City of Ottawa. 

    The study considers the risk of flooding, erosion and other hazards along Stevens Creek from Malakoff Road to the Rideau River. Members of the public are invited to review the draft regulation and hazard maps during a public consultation period between November 29, 2021 and January 13, 2022.

    The new mapping shows areas that are subject to natural hazards such as flooding and unstable slopes, or that have natural environmental features such as wetlands. The mapping will be used by the City of Ottawa when updating its Official Plans and Zoning Schedules and in the review of development applications under the Planning Act. RVCA will also use the mapping to guide the review of development applications submitted under the RVCA’s Development, Interference with Wetlands and Alterations to Shorelines and Watercourses Regulation.

    The goal of this mapping is to help ensure sound planning decisions are made — keeping people and property safe. Accurate engineered hazard mapping is the foundation of effective floodplain and resource management. 

    Members of the public are encouraged to review the draft mapping (available online at www.rvca.ca/stevens-creek) and connect with an RVCA Resource Specialist to understand how the mapping may affect their property. Due to COVID-19, we are not holding an in-person public open house. Instead, we invite you to contact an RVCA Resource Specialist via: 

    • email: 
    • phone: 613-692-3571 or 1-800-267-3504 ext. 1132 or 1193

    Individual or small group meetings on-line or in person can also be booked to discuss local impacts and concerns.

    Conservation Authority staff also welcome local input on the mapping, including historical records of past flood events, slope failures, erosion, news clippings, photographs and even anecdotal stories to help confirm the reasonableness of calculations and resulting hazard mapping. 

    This study is just one of several ongoing hazard mapping studies taking place in the watershed. For a complete list of ongoing work, please visit www.rvca.ca. Learn more about the hazard mapping process in this short video:

     

    BECKWITH TOWNSHIP, Nov. 10, 2021 — The Rideau Valley Conservation Authority (RVCA) is asking for public input on a new hazard mapping study for the Jock River in Beckwith Township. 

    The study considers the risk of flooding, erosion and other hazards from Ashton Station Road to approximately the south limit of the community of Franktown. Members of the public are invited to review the draft regulation and hazard maps during the public consultation period between November 15 to December 22, 2021.

    The new mapping shows areas that are subject to natural hazards such as flooding and unstable slopes or that have natural environmental features such as wetlands. The mapping will be used by Beckwith Township when updating its Official Plans and Zoning Schedules and in the review of development applications under the Planning Act. RVCA will also use the mapping to guide the review of development applications submitted under the RVCA’s Development, Interference with Wetlands and Alterations to Shorelines and Watercourses Regulation.

    The goal of this mapping is to help ensure sound planning decisions are made — keeping people and property safe. Accurate engineered hazard mapping is the foundation of effective floodplain and resource management. This is the first time this section of the Jock River has been hazard mapped.

    Members of the public are encouraged to review the draft mapping (available online at www.rvca.ca/upper-jock) and connect with an RVCA Resource specialist to understand how the mapping may affect their property. Due to COVID-19, we are not holding an in-person public open house. Instead, we invite you to contact an RVCA Resource Specialist via: 

      • email: 
      • phone: 613-692-3571 or 1-800-267-3504 ext. 1132 or 1193

    Individual or small group meetings on-line or in person can also be booked to discuss local impacts and concerns.

    Conservation Authority staff also welcome local input on the mapping, including historical records of past flood events, slope failures, erosion, news clippings, photographs and even anecdotal stories to help confirm the reasonableness of calculations and resulting hazard mapping. 


    This study is just one of several ongoing hazard mapping studies taking place in the watershed. For a complete list of ongoing work, please visit www.rvca.ca. Learn more about the hazard mapping process in this short video:

     

    Project Status: Complete

    The Rideau Valley Conservation Authority (RVCA) has completed a hazard mapping study for the Jock River between Ashton Station Road and approximately the south limit of the community of Franktown. This section of the Jock River is being hazard mapped for the first time; however, both the Goodwood Marsh and Franktown Swamp (both Provincially Significant Wetlands and both within the study limits) have been regulated since 2006.

    These maps have been traditionally known as “floodplain mapping” or “regulation mapping” and they show areas that are prone to natural hazards such as flooding, erosion and natural environment features such as wetlands. 

    When completed, the mapping will be used by Beckwith Township when updating their Official Plan and Zoning Schedules and in the review of development applications under the Planning Act. RVCA will also use the mapping to guide the review of development applications submitted under the Development, Interference with Wetlands and Alterations to Shorelines and Watercourses Regulation.

    Due to Covid 19, we are not holding an in-person public open house. Instead, we invite you to contact an RVCA Resource Specialists at 613-692-3571 (toll-free 1-800-267-3504) extension 1193 or 1132 or . If you prefer, we can book individual or small group meetings on-line or in person to discuss local impacts and concerns. This is also an opportunity to learn how flood risks and slope stability hazards may affect shoreline management and/or development in Beckwith Township. Authority staff welcome historical records of past flood events, slope failure, erosion, news clippings, photographs and even anecdotal stories to help confirm the reasonableness of calculations and resulting hazard mapping.

    This study is just one of several ongoing hazard mapping studies taking place in the watershed. For a complete list on ongoing work, click here.

      Stillwater wetland project a win for everyone — The benefits of the recently completed Stillwater wetland restoration near Moodie Drive in Nepean will trickle down to many facets of the community. Want to read more? Click here.


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      OTTAWA, Oct. 22, 2021 – The nation’s capital is now two million trees richer thanks to the City of Ottawa, local conservation authorities and rural landowners.

      The City of Ottawa’s Green Acres Reforestation Program hit its two-million milestone this spring. 

      The program is a partnership between the City and its three local conservation authorities: Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority in the west, Rideau Valley Conservation Authority in central and south Ottawa and South Nation Conservation Authority in the east. 

      On Friday, Oct. 22 Mayor Jim Watson joined environment committee chair Coun. Scott Moffatt and other dignitaries to dedicate a white spruce at RVCA headquarters in honour of the milestone.

      “Planting trees is one of the best ways to mitigate climate change and to protect our communities against extreme weather like floods,” said RVCA forestry manager Ian Cochrane. “We are incredibly thankful to the City and its rural landowners for their commitment to this program.” 

      The program generates huge benefits for the entire region. Along with creating the oxygen we need to breathe, trees also capture carbon, clean the air, create habitat and help reduce the impacts of floods, droughts and erosion. 

      The City provides annual base funding so the conservation authorities can work with willing landowners to create custom planting plans, order the seedlings and complete the planting each spring.

      Landowners commit to reforesting at least 1.25 acres with a minimum of 1,000 trees. Conservation authority staff maintain the new trees for five years to maximize survival rates.

      Green Acres has planted an average of 92,500 trees each year, with a target of 75,000 trees planted annually, primarily in the city’s four rural wards.

      The top Ottawa wards for tree planting include:

      • West Carleton-March (922,062 trees to date)
      • Rideau-Goulbourn (569,536 trees to date) 
      • Cumberland (249,014 trees to date) 
      • Osgoode (220,110 trees to date) 
      • Plus 73,950 across the remaining Ottawa wards

      While the 2022 program is already full, residents interested in reforesting their land are encouraged to visit ottawa.ca for more information or to contact their local conservation authority.

      QUOTES:

      “Forest growth and conservation has never been more vital. The work done through the Green Acres program by the City and its partners will play a huge role in combatting climate change and maintaining the beauty of our rural areas for generations to come.”
             -Mayor Jim Watson
          
      “The fact that the program is completely full until 2023 is a huge testament to our residents’ dedication to re-building Ottawa’s rural forests. I encourage all residents with empty land to consider applying for the Green Acres program and help us continue building on this milestone.” 
            -Councillor Scott Moffatt, Chair of the Standing Committee on Environmental Protection, Water and Waste Management

      For more information contact RVCA Director of Communications Diane Downey at .

      -30-

      (WCS-LW - 5/2021)
      October 6, 2021 – Watershed conditions in the Rideau Valley Watershed have returned to “Normal’ under the Ontario Low Water Response Program.

      With above average rainfall amounts across the watershed over the last month, stream flows and water levels have recovered from the previous low water status and are now above average for this time of year.

      Parks Canada continues to closely monitor the water levels throughout the Rideau Canal system inside the Rideau Valley watershed. Water levels in the reservoir lakes, located in the upper reaches of the Rideau Valley watershed, are now near normal for this time of year. Rideau River flows downstream of Big Rideau Lake remain at minimum value. Water levels in the Rideau River below Smiths Falls are within navigable ranges for this time of year.

      Conservation Authority staff continue to monitor conditions and communicate with water managers throughout the watershed. Updates to this message will be issued as conditions warrant.

      More resources:

       -end-


      More Information:
      Contact: Brian Stratton, RVCA Manager Engineering Services
      Rideau Valley Conservation Authority

      613-692-6804, 1-800-267-3504 ext. 1141

      Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is a partnership of municipalities within the Rideau Valley watershed created under the Conservation Authorities Act to deliver a range of programs in watershed management and natural resource conservation.

      RVCA Watershed Conditions Statements:

      • Water Safety – High flows, unstable banks, melting ice or other factors that could be dangerous for recreational users such as anglers, canoeists, hikers, children, pets, etc. Flooding is not expected.
      • Flood Outlook – Early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts, calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high winds or other conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams and/or lakeshore flooding or erosion.
      • Flood Watch – Flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services and individuals in flood prone areas should prepare.
      • Flood Warning – Flooding is imminent or already occurring in specific watercourses or municipalities.

       

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      Contact Us

      Address:
      Rideau Valley Conservation Authority
      3889 Rideau Valley Drive
      Manotick, Ontario K4M 1A5

      Phone:
      613-692-3571, 1-800-267-3504

      Email:

      Hours:

      Regular Hours: Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

      Member of: conservation ontario