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(WCS – R02/2022)
March 4, 2022 – Environment Canada is forecasting temperatures above 10 degrees Celcius and rain on Sunday. This weather event will likely result in elevated water runoff to all waterways because of snow melt and rainfall.

Although no significant flooding is anticipated, water levels and flows are expected to increase in all waterways in the Rideau Valley Watershed. Depending on how much snow melts and rain falls, residents who are adjacent to the smaller creeks and streams are advised to keep a close watch on water levels and flows and should take the necessary precautions to protect their property, such as:

  • Ensuring sump pump is clear, in good working condition and has a backwater valve
  • Ensuring easy access to a portable backup generator and pump

With the expected temperature changes and increase in water levels and flows in the coming days, ice cover on lakes, ditches, local streams and rivers will be unstable. Extreme caution should be exercised by everyone when near local waterbodies. Parents should inform their children of the risks and provide appropriate supervision.

This watershed conditions statement is in effect until Tuesday March 8, 2022 at 5 PM or until an update has been issued.

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More Information:
Contact: Brian Stratton, RVCA Manager Engineering Services
Rideau Valley Conservation Authority

613-692-6804, 1-800-267-3504 ext. 1141

Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is a partnership of municipalities within the Rideau Valley watershed created under the Conservation Authorities Act to deliver a range of programs in watershed management and natural resource conservation.

RVCA Watershed Conditions Statements:

  • Water Safety – High flows, unstable banks, melting ice or other factors that could be dangerous for recreational users such as anglers, canoeists, hikers, children, pets, etc. Flooding is not expected.
  • Flood Outlook – Early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts, calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high winds or other conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams and/or lakeshore flooding or erosion.
  • Flood Watch – Flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services and individuals in flood prone areas should prepare.
  • Flood Warning – Flooding is imminent or already occurring in specific watercourses or municipalities.

 

OTTAWA, March 1, 2022 – It’s officially March, and that means it's time to haul in your fishing huts, hockey nets and other gear before the ice is out. 

Building materials, rink lights, benches and shovels, garbage and other waste can pollute our rivers and lakes, be toxic for fish and wildlife and create hazards for boaters and swimmers in the spring. 

Under Ontario law, Eastern Ontario fishing huts must be removed by March 15. However, as the sun gets stronger and the weather begins to warm, it’s wise to remove them sooner rather than later. If you wait too long, you may find the ice too thin to access your belongings! It is an offence under the Public Lands Act to leave your ice hut out after ice break up, even if that occurs before the removal deadline.

So take some time this week to collect your belongings, dispose of your garbage and dismantle any structures you’ve built on the ice. Protect and respect the river that has kept you going all through the long winter months! 

For complete fishing hut regulations visit www.ontario.ca/page/ice-fishing. To learn about water quality in your area and how to improve it, visit watersheds.rvca.ca.

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RIDEAU VALLEY, Feb. 25, 2022 – Confidence. Leadership. Curiosity. Wonder. These are just a few of the traits your kids will bring home from Forest School when it starts up again this spring at Foley Mountain and Baxter conservation areas. 

The weekly programs focus on outdoor, play-based, child-centred learning. What does that mean, you wonder? It means students have a say in how and where they learn; they can choose to focus on activities that interest them, and in turn be more engaged in their learning. 

It means they’re outside all day long, returning to the same location each week to develop a deep connection to a particular outdoor place and the many wonders it holds within. It means students are taking and managing risks, problem-solving with their peers and putting their leadership and decision-making skills to work. 

It means they’re learning in nature, through nature. And it’s all really, really good for them. 

“Learning outdoors has so many benefits. They’re more active, they have better mental health,” said Rebecca Whitman, Foley Mountain’s outdoor educator and certified Ontario teacher. “I really see the benefits of the hands-on learning environment and letting them choose where to focus. It’s hard as adults and teachers to transfer that power but it helps them be more engaged. We try to say yes to all of their requests.”

Research has shown that playing outside has many physical benefits, such as greater physical fitness, lower risk of nearsightedness, better sleep rhythms and more exposure to Vitamin D. But children who explore and play outside also reap psychological benefits, such as improved stress management, better concentration skills and more stable mental health. 

Academically, the program supports the Ontario curriculum, although Whitman said it “may check boxes in a different order than a traditional classroom.” Math may come in the form of measuring various skulls to identify the animals, for example. Literacy is encouraged through themed story times, map-making or using a field guide for plant identification.

Risky play – climbing trees, balancing on boulders and generally doing anything that might rouse a “be careful” from worried parents – is a big component, as well. 

“Risky play is incredibly important for their physical and cognitive development,” Whitman said. “Students can learn how to manage risk and their response to it.”

Registration for the spring session of Forest School is now open for Foley Mountain in Westport, while registration for the program at Baxter near Manotick will open March 1. 

Beginning March 22, Foley Mountain will offer a half-day program for kids aged 3 to 5 on Wednesdays, and half and full-day programs for kids aged 4 to 10 on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The semester runs weekly until the week of June 14. To learn more or to register, visit https://www.rvca.ca/outdoor-education/foley-mountain-ca/foley-mountain-forest-scool

The same week, Baxter will begin its spring semester of half and full-day programs for kids aged 4 to 10, offered Monday to Friday. To learn more or to join the mailing list visit https://www.rvca.ca/outdoor-education/baxter/baxter-forest-school

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(WCS – R01/2022)
February 16, 2022 – Environment Canada is forecasting mild temperatures, with 15 to 25 mm of rain starting late today through Thursday afternoon followed by much cooler temperatures and possible snowfall accumulations of 10 to 20 cm of snow before mid-day on Friday. This weather event will likely result in elevated water runoff to all waterways because of snow melt and high rainfall amounts before freezing up again.

Although no significant flooding is anticipated, water levels and flows are expected to increase in all waterways in the Rideau Valley Watershed. Depending on how much snow melts and rain falls, residents who are adjacent to the smaller creeks and streams are advised to keep a close watch on water levels and flows and should take the necessary precautions to protect their property, such as:

  • Ensuring sump pump is clear, in good working condition and has a backwater valve
  • Ensuring easy access to a portable backup generator and pump

With the expected temperature changes and increase in water levels and flows in the coming days, ice cover on lakes, ditches, local streams and rivers will be unstable. Extreme caution should be exercised by everyone when near local waterbodies. Parents should inform their children of the risks and provide appropriate supervision.

This watershed conditions statement is in effect until Wednesday February 23, 2022 at 5 PM or until an update has been issued.

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More Information:
Contact: Brian Stratton, RVCA Manager Engineering Services
Rideau Valley Conservation Authority

613-692-6804, 1-800-267-3504 ext. 1141

Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is a partnership of municipalities within the Rideau Valley watershed created under the Conservation Authorities Act to deliver a range of programs in watershed management and natural resource conservation.

RVCA Watershed Conditions Statements:

  • Water Safety – High flows, unstable banks, melting ice or other factors that could be dangerous for recreational users such as anglers, canoeists, hikers, children, pets, etc. Flooding is not expected.
  • Flood Outlook – Early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts, calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high winds or other conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams and/or lakeshore flooding or erosion.
  • Flood Watch – Flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services and individuals in flood prone areas should prepare.
  • Flood Warning – Flooding is imminent or already occurring in specific watercourses or municipalities.

 

January 05, 2022

Regan Van Dusen

December 15, 2021

Transition Plan

(WCS - RO6/2021)
December 10, 2021 – Environment Canada is forecasting rainfall amounts of 20 to 40 mm starting the evening of Friday, Dec. 10 and continuing through Saturday night. This forecasted rainfall together with mild temperatures will melt snow and create runoff, causing all water levels and flows to increase throughout the Rideau Valley Watershed.

Because of a wet fall season, most water levels and flows are currently above normal. Although this rain and snow-melt event will not cause significant flooding, it could cause localized flooding in small watercourses, urban areas and ditches.  

The RVCA reminds the public to exercise extreme caution around all waterbodies and remind children about the dangers of playing near open water. Residents are reminded to make sure their sump pumps are in good working condition and to help reduce ponding by keeping ditches, culverts, and storm drains clear of obstructions. 

This watershed conditions statement is in effect until Friday, December 17, 2021 at 5 PM or until an update has been issued.

-end-


More Information:
Contact: Brian Stratton, RVCA Manager Engineering Services
Rideau Valley Conservation Authority

613-692-6804, 1-800-267-3504 ext. 1141

Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is a partnership of municipalities within the Rideau Valley watershed created under the Conservation Authorities Act to deliver a range of programs in watershed management and natural resource conservation.

RVCA Watershed Conditions Statements:

  • Water Safety – High flows, unstable banks, melting ice or other factors that could be dangerous for recreational users such as anglers, canoeists, hikers, children, pets, etc. Flooding is not expected.
  • Flood Outlook – Early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts, calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high winds or other conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams and/or lakeshore flooding or erosion.
  • Flood Watch – Flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services and individuals in flood prone areas should prepare.
  • Flood Warning – Flooding is imminent or already occurring in specific watercourses or municipalities.

 

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Contact Us

Address:
Rideau Valley Conservation Authority
3889 Rideau Valley Drive
Manotick, Ontario K4M 1A5

Phone:
613-692-3571, 1-800-267-3504

Email:

Hours:

Regular Hours: Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Member of: conservation ontario