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Displaying items by tag: Flood Outlook

Updated Flood Outlook & Flood Watch: Rain in Forecast Will Cause Water Levels to Increase Again Across the Rideau Valley Watershed

(WCS – R05/2020) March 27, 2020 –The short-term forecast is calling for rainfall amounts of 35 millimetres or more on Sunday and into Monday with above zero temperatures. As such, water levels and flows across the Rideau Valley Watershed are expected to increase again.

A FLOOD WATCH is being issued for properties around Christie Lake and Wolfe Lake. In these areas, residents should expect freshet like water levels and flows. Parks Canada staff are closely monitoring the water levels in Bobs Lake and Christie Lake, and operations at the Bolingbroke Dam.

A FLOOD WATCH continues for the low-lying areas along Stevens Creek and Taylor Drain in the Village of North Gower; however, water levels are expected to be less than those that have already been seen this spring.

A FLOOD OUTLOOK is being maintained/issued for the following areas:

  • Properties around Bob’s Lake and Tay River in the upper Rideau Valley Watershed. In these areas, residents should expect spring like water levels and flows. Parks Canada staff are closely monitoring the water levels in Bobs Lake and Christie Lake, and operations at the Bolingbroke Dam will take place as required, to balance the levels in Bobs Lake and Christie Lake.
  • Properties around the Long Reach (Burritts Rapids to Kars) of the Rideau River.
  • Properties around the smaller creeks and streams in the lower Rideau Valley Watershed, including the low-lying roads and waterfront properties adjacent to the Jock River (near Richmond).
  • Any connected creeks or ditches.

Extreme caution should be exercised by everyone when near local waterbodies. Please note that riverbanks are very slippery at this time of year and it’s quite easy for a child or adult to inadvertently fall into the water. Parents should inform their children of the risks and provide appropriate supervision.

Residents in flood prone or low-lying areas, historically susceptible to flooding, should continue to take the necessary precautions to protect their property, such as:

  • Ensuring sump pump is clear, in good working condition and has a backwater valve
  • Ensuring easy access to a portable backup generator and pump
  • Ensuring downspouts are clear and the outlet is at least 3 metres from the dwelling
  • Securing items that might float away as flows increase
  • Removing valuable items from basements or lower floors that could be subject to flooding
  • Keeping emergency phone numbers handy
  • Familiarizing yourself with your municipality’s Emergency Preparedness Plan

This watershed conditions statement is in effect until April 9, 2020, at 5 p.m. and will be updated at that time unless the forecast or conditions change.


"Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is a partnership of municipalities within the Rideau Valley watershed created under the Conservation Authorities Act to deliver a range of programs in watershed management and natural resource conservation."

 RVCA Watershed Conditions Statements:

  • Water Safety – High flows, unstable banks, melting ice or other factors that could be dangerous for recreational users such as anglers, canoeists, hikers, children, pets, etc. Flooding is not expected.
  • Flood Outlook – Early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts, calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high winds or other conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams and/or lakeshore flooding or erosion.
  • Flood Watch – Flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services and individuals in flood prone areas should prepare.
  • Flood Warning – Flooding is imminent or already occurring in specific watercourses or municipalities.

March 25, 2021­ - Above normal temperatures in March have melted most of the snow across the Rideau Valley watershed. The snow melt was quite rapid at first causing water levels and flows to rise quickly in some areas. This was followed by a more gradual melt of the remaining snow. For the most part, water levels and flows are about normal for this time of year and are well below flood thresholds.    

The short-term forecast is calling for rainfall amounts of between 40 to 50 millimetres between Thursday and Sunday, with heaviest rain on Friday, and cooler temperatures but still above zero. If the rain comes as forecast, water levels and flows will increase again across the Rideau Valley Watershed. As such, an updated FLOOD OUTLOOK is in effect due the possibility of flooding for all low-lying areas along all waterways, especially near small creeks and streams. Parks Canada staff who manage the water levels for the Rideau Canal have indicated that the levels in the upper watershed lakes are currently below average and expected to rise but not to flood levels.

Further to the above, a FLOOD WATCH is in effect for the low-lying areas along Stevens Creek and Taylor Drain in the Village of North Gower. If the rain comes as forecast, water levels may be similar too, or possibly higher than, those already observed this spring.

With the rising water levels expected over the coming days, the remaining ice cover on lakes, ditches, local streams, and rivers will be unstable. In addition, ice cover in the rivers and streams may breakup as a result of warm temperatures and higher flows, increasing the risk of ice jams and associated overbank flooding. Extreme caution should be exercised by everyone when near local waterbodies. Parents should inform their children of the risks and provide appropriate supervision. 

Residents in flood-prone or low-lying areas, historically susceptible to flooding, should take the necessary precautions to protect their property, such as:

  • Ensuring sump pump is clear, in good working condition and has a backwater valve 
  • Ensuring easy access to a portable backup generator and pump
  • Ensuring downspouts are clear and the outlet is at least 3 metres from the dwelling 
  • Securing items that might float away as flows increase 
  • Removing valuable items from basements or lower floors that could be subject to flooding
  • Keeping emergency phone numbers handy
  • Familiarizing yourself with your municipality’s Emergency Preparedness Plan

This watershed conditions statement is in effect until April 15, 2021, at 5 p.m. and will be updated at that time unless the forecast or conditions change.

Water Conditions Statement: Flood Outlook — Lower Ottawa River

March 26, 2021 — A Flood Outlook Statement is being issued for areas along the Lower Ottawa River. Based on current snow cover and weather forecast, it is anticipated that levels and flows along the main stem of the river from Arnprior to Hawkesbury are expected to begin to rise over the next few days but will remain within the normal range of fluctuations associated with the spring freshet period.

Presently, the snow cover varies significantly across the 146,300 square kilometre Ottawa River basin, with some areas in the south of the basin having no snow cover at all. Where there is snow cover, the snow water content (amount of water contained in the snow) is lower than average over much of the basin except in the west-central portion of the basin where average conditions prevail. Snow water content is only one of several factors impacting the magnitude of the spring freshet each year.

The Ottawa River Regulating Committee indicates that with the current weather forecast, flooding in low-lying areas is not expected to occur over the next few days. Levels are currently expected to remain below flood thresholds. While it is not possible to completely rule out the occurrence of a large spring freshet, the factors that are known at this time, namely below average snow water content in all locations and an early spring start, are positive indicators of a year without excessive flooding along the Ottawa River.

Throughout the freshet period, the combination of heavy rainfall and snowmelt may result in rapid increases in water levels and flows on the main stem of the Ottawa River from Mattawa down to the Montreal Region.

Residents in flood-prone areas are encouraged to closely follow evolving conditions and to take necessary measures. Residents are advised to stay away from watercourses where flows are high and where banks might be unstable. Parents are encouraged to explain dangers to children.

The Mississippi Valley, Rideau Valley, and South Nation Conservation Authorities monitor water levels and weather forecasts with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry as part of the Flood Forecasting and Warning Program. Updates are provided as conditions change.

The Ottawa River Regulating Committee will be reassessing forecast conditions and providing hydrological condition updates on its website daily at ottawariver.ca/forecasts/.

To view current flood warnings across Ontario, visit: www.ontario.ca/law-and-safety/flood-forecasting-and-warning-program.

This FLOOD OUTLOOK STATEMENT is in effect until April 16, 2021 at 5:00 PM.

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Definitions:

  • Water Conditions Statement: Water Safety: indicates that high flows, melting ice or other factors could be dangerous for such users as boaters, anglers and swimmers but flooding is not expected.
  • Water Conditions Statement: Flood Outlook: gives early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high winds or other conditions.
  • Flood Watch: potential for flooding exists within specific watercourses and municipalities.
  • Flood Warning: flooding is imminent or occurring within specific watercourses and municipalities.

Communiqué sur les conditions du bassin versant : Perspective de crue – Cours inférieur de la rivière des Outaouais

Le 26 mars 2021 — Un communiqué de perspective de crue est émis pour les régions situées le long du cours inférieur de la rivière des Outaouais. D'après la couverture de neige actuelle et les prévisions météorologiques, on prévoit que les niveaux et les débits le long du tronçon principal de la rivière, d'Arnprior à Hawkesbury, devraient commencer à augmenter au cours des prochains jours, mais resteront dans la plage normale des fluctuations associées à la période de crue printanière.

À l'heure actuelle, la couverture de neige varie considérablement dans le bassin de la rivière des Outaouais d'une superficie de 146 300 km², certaines régions du sud du bassin n'ayant aucune couverture de neige. Là où il y a une couverture de neige, la teneur en eau de la neige (quantité d'eau contenue dans la neige) est inférieure à la moyenne dans la majeure partie du bassin, sauf dans la partie centrale ouest du bassin où les conditions sont moyennes. La teneur en eau de la neige n'est qu'un des nombreux facteurs qui influent sur l'ampleur de la crue printanière chaque année.

Le Comité de régularisation de la rivière des Outaouais indique qu'avec les prévisions météorologiques actuelles, on ne prévoit pas d'inondation dans les basses terres au cours des prochains jours. On s'attend actuellement à ce que les niveaux demeurent sous les seuils d'inondation. Bien qu'il ne soit pas possible d'exclure complètement l'occurrence d'une grande crue printanière, les facteurs connus à l'heure actuelle, à savoir une teneur en eau de la neige inférieure à la moyenne dans tous les endroits et un début de printemps précoce, sont des indicateurs positifs d'une année sans inondation excessive le long de la rivière des Outaouais.

Tout au long de la période de crue printanière, la combinaison de fortes pluies et de fonte des neiges peut entraîner une augmentation rapide des niveaux d'eau et des débits sur le cours principal de la rivière des Outaouais, de Mattawa jusqu'à la région de Montréal.

Les résidents des zones sujettes aux inondations sont invités à suivre de près l'évolution des conditions et à prendre les mesures nécessaires. Il est conseillé aux résidents de ne pas s'approcher des cours d'eau où le débit est élevé et où les berges peuvent être instables. On recommande aux parents d'expliquer les dangers aux enfants.

Les offices de protection de la nature des rivières Mississippi, Rideau et Nation Sud surveillent les niveaux d'eau et les prévisions météorologiques avec le ministère des Richesses naturelles et des Forêts dans le cadre du programme de prévision et d'alerte des crues. Des mises à jour sont émises en fonction de l'évolution des conditions.

Le Comité de régularisation de la rivière des Outaouais réévaluera les prévisions et publiera quotidiennement des mises à jour des conditions hydrologiques sur son site Web à ottawariver.ca/forecasts/. Pour consulter les alertes de crue actuelles en Ontario, visitez le site : www.ontario.ca/law-and-safety/flood-forecasting-and-warning-program.

Ce COMMUNIQUÉ DE PERSPECTIVE DE CRUE est en vigueur jusqu'au 16 avril 2021 à 17 h.

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Définitions :

  • Communiqué sur les conditions des bassins versants – Sécurité aquatique : indique que des débits forts, de la glace fondante ou d’autres facteurs peuvent être dangereux pour des utilisateurs comme les plaisanciers, les pêcheurs à la ligne et les baigneurs, mais qu’une crue n’est pas prévue.
  • Communiqué sur les conditions des bassins versants – Perspective de crue :préavis de crue possible basé sur des prévisions de pluies abondantes, de fonte des neiges, de forts vents ou autre.
  • Veille de crue :possibilité de crue pour des cours d’eau et municipalités spécifiques.
  • Avertissement de crue : crue immimente ou en cours pour des cours d’eau et
    municipalités spécifiques.

COVID-19 Notice: RVCA Planning and Regulation Services

The health, safety and well-being of our clients and staff is our top priority. The Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is responding to the COVID-19 pandemic and making changes in how it delivers its programs and services.

The RVCA has closed its office to the public and staff are working remotely; however, we are moving forward with a business as usual approach. RVCA essential services including planning and permitting remain active.

  • Staff continue to provide service over the phone and through email. Please call 613-692-3571 or 1-800-267-3504 or search online at rvca.ca/directory for a directory of services and contact information.
  • Permits and other hard copy documents can be couriered or dropped off or delivered in our drop box at the RVCA Administrative office at Box 599, 3889 Rideau Valley Drive, Manotick ON K4M 1A5 or emailed to the appropriate staff member.
  • Planning application payments can be taken over the phone at 613-692-3571 ext. 1128.

  • Section 28 permit payments can be taken over the phone at 613-692-3571 ext. 1193.
  • Onsite inspections will only be conducted without any other persons on site. Should anyone be onsite during visits, we ask that they remain inside their homes or vehicles and that they speak to our inspectors by phone during the visit.

We will continue to monitor the situation and reassess as more information becomes available. Please check the RVCA website and social media platforms for updates. Your patience and cooperation are appreciated.

Contact Us

Address:
Rideau Valley Conservation Authority
3889 Rideau Valley Drive
Manotick, Ontario K4M 1A5

Phone:
613-692-3571, 1-800-267-3504

Email:

Hours:

Regular Hours: Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Member of: conservation ontario