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Super User

January 06, 2020

Laura Cummings

December 17, 2019

2020 Budget and Work Plan

December 2, 2019 – Local Conservation Authorities are pleased with the findings of the independent review of the Spring 2019 flood. Retained by the Ontario Government, Special Advisor on Flooding Douglas NcNeil recognizes Ontario’s unique watershed-based Conservation Authority model and its success in minimizing flood risks and mitigating flood impacts.

Ottawa area Conservation Authorities (Mississippi, Rideau and South Nation) met with Mr. McNeil and other agencies in September to review the spring flood and discuss local experiences. Ideas were shared on how to improve protection of Ontario residents and their properties from flooding. The McNeil report contains 66 actions, and the three Conservation Authorities are pleased to see recommendations raised during those consultations in the report, including the need to:

  • Update provincial guidance,
  • Increase attention to floodplain mapping and the impacts of climate change,
  • Conserve and restore green infrastructure like wetlands and forests that store water and reduce flooding, and
  • Continue support for the role of Conservation Authorities in coordinating planning
    and action.

Specifically, the report, available at ontario.ca/floodreport, encourages the Province to “consult with Conservation Authorities on their application of the natural hazards-based approach and the risk-based approach to managing flooding.”

Flood management is a shared responsibility among municipalities, emergency management officials, the Province, and Conservation Authorities. Authorities work closely with member municipalities to identify flood risk areas and to guide development activities outside of floodplains. The watershed-based approach has protected Ontarians for decades and has avoided millions in flood damages.

This approach has also built resilient communities that not only have flood control infrastructure but also important “green infrastructure” that reduces the impacts of climate change and flooding.

Local Conservation Authorities look forward to maintaining and improving flood management programs and are eager to assist the Province in implementing all of the recommendations outlined in the Flood Advisor’s report.

-End-

For more information:

Sally McIntyre, General Manager                             
Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority                
613-253-0006 ext. 223                                              
                                              

Sommer Casgrain-Robertson, General Manager
Rideau Valley Conservation Authority
613-692-3571 ext. 1214

Angela Coleman, General Manager
South Nation Conservation
613-984-2948

Stillwater Creek Slope Stabilization Project

RVCA was contracted by the City of Ottawa to design and implement remediation of an eroded bank of Stillwater Creek adjacent to Nautica Private and Carling Avenue and into the Ottawa River. Erosion of the slope is being caused by fluctuating flow and velocity in the creek and this project will help prevent potential slope failure.

Erosion 1 copy   Erosion 2
East Bank Erosion    East Bank Erosion 

The headwaters of Stillwater Creek begin in the National Capital Commission’s Stoney Swamp. Stoney Swamp is almost 2000 hectares in size, and is a mix of woodland, wetland and regenerating fields. From Stoney Swamp, Stillwater Creek runs through a heavily channelized and impacted area adjacent to Robertson Road. The creek turns into its natural morphology downstream of Robertson Road until the Highway 417 crossing. It then becomes channelized again, as it runs through Wesley Clover Park on Corkstown Road. The creek flows through another large wetland before Moodie Drive crossing, and from there runs parallel between Highway 417 and Corkstown Road until it turns north flowing through residential neighborhoods before emptying into the Ottawa River between the Nepean Sailing Club and Andrew Haydon Park.

The first phase to be completed is on the west bank of the creek in the treed area. The highlighted blue area is the East bank portion of the work to be completed as the second phase.

Map of work area
Map of the Work Area

Further erosion of the bank of Stillwater Creek at Nautica Private could be detrimental to the properties on Nautica Private and to the safety of the residents. 

Rock Toe Berm Construction

RVCA looked into multiple alternatives for the slope stabilization of the banks of Stillwater Creek. RVCA decided on the construction of a rock toe berm to stabilize the east bank of the creek. Once the design was complete, RVCA had it checked by a third-party local geotechnical engineering firm.

The rock toe berm has been designed to make a “key” at the base of the slope to be filled with large “rock protection” sized stones. The slope will then be backfilled at a 1.5:1 (h:v) slope and the large stones will extend above the creeks assumed 100-year flood elevation. The work is expected to protect the properties on Nautica Private from further property damage due to erosion.

Timing

The project took place from approximately December 22019 – February 28, 2020.

Project Partners

City of Ottawa
Rideau Valley Conservation Authority

Information

Terry K. Davidson, P.Eng.
Director of Engineering & Regulations

  • Low Water Status Returned to “Normal” in Rideau Valley Watershed

    (WCS-LW - 5/2021)
    October 6, 2021 – Watershed conditions in the Rideau Valley Watershed have returned to “Normal’ under the Ontario Low Water Response Program.

    With above average rainfall amounts across the watershed over the last month, stream flows and water levels have recovered from the previous low water status and are now above average for this time of year.

    Parks Canada continues to closely monitor the water levels throughout the Rideau Canal system inside the Rideau Valley watershed. Water levels in the reservoir lakes, located in the upper reaches of the Rideau Valley watershed, are now near normal for this time of year. Rideau River flows downstream of Big Rideau Lake remain at minimum value. Water levels in the Rideau River below Smiths Falls are within navigable ranges for this time of year.

    Conservation Authority staff continue to monitor conditions and communicate with water managers throughout the watershed. Updates to this message will be issued as conditions warrant.

    More resources:

     -end-


    More Information:
    Contact: Brian Stratton, RVCA Manager Engineering Services
    Rideau Valley Conservation Authority

    613-692-6804, 1-800-267-3504 ext. 1141

    Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is a partnership of municipalities within the Rideau Valley watershed created under the Conservation Authorities Act to deliver a range of programs in watershed management and natural resource conservation.

    RVCA Watershed Conditions Statements:

    • Water Safety – High flows, unstable banks, melting ice or other factors that could be dangerous for recreational users such as anglers, canoeists, hikers, children, pets, etc. Flooding is not expected.
    • Flood Outlook – Early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts, calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high winds or other conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams and/or lakeshore flooding or erosion.
    • Flood Watch – Flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services and individuals in flood prone areas should prepare.
    • Flood Warning – Flooding is imminent or already occurring in specific watercourses or municipalities.

     

November 18, 2019

Low Water Index

Our low water index has four stages:The RVCA issues water conditions statements to inform residents, municipalities and other stakeholders of changing water levels across the watershed.

low water normal

A green gauge means conditions are normal. No low flow or drought conditions exist.

level 1

This category reflects concern.
80% to 60% of long-term average precipitation for 540 day and/or 90 day precipitation totals and/or 7-day average streamflows less than the 5 year return period low flow.

level 2

This category suggests a potentially serious problem is pending.
60% to 40% of long-term average precipitation for 540, 90 and/or 30 day precipitation totals and/or 7-day average streamflows less than the 10 year return period low flow.

flood watch

This category indicates a failure of the water supply to meet demand.
Less than 40% of long-term average precipitation for 540, 90 and/or 30 day precipitation totals and/or 7-day average streamflows less than the 10 year return period low flow.

Click here for the RVCA's Watershed Conditions Statements.

November 18, 2019

Flood Index

Know the warning system

The RVCA issues water conditions statements to inform residents, municipalities and other stakeholders of changing water levels across the watershed.

flood normal

A green gauge means conditions are normal.

flood safety

A yellow Water Safety Statement means rivers could have high flows, unsafe banks, melting ice or other factors that could be dangerous. However, flooding is not expected.

flood outlook

A yellow Flood Outlook Statement is an early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high wind or other conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams, lakeshore flooding or erosion.

flood watch

An orange Flood Watch means flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services and individual landowners in flood-prone areas should prepare.

flood warning

A red Flood Warning means flooding is imminent or already occurring in specific watercourses or municipalities.

Click here for the RVCA's Watershed Conditions Statements. Click here for RVCA real-time flows and water levels.

For water levels and flows on the Ottawa River visit the Ottawa River Regulation Planning Board

A flood is coming: What should you do?

If you live in a flood-prone area, the best thing you can do to keep your family and property safe is to make a plan and be prepared to follow it.

Each flood situation is unique, and your emergency plan should account for that – and be ready well in advance.

1. Know the warning system

The RVCA issues water conditions statements to inform residents, municipalities and other stakeholders of changing water levels across the watershed.

 
flood normal
flood safety
flood outlook
flood watch
flood warning
 

Click on a gauge for a larger image

GREEN: A green gauge means conditions are normal.

YELLOW: A yellow gauge can mean two things:

  • A yellow Water Safety Statement means rivers could have high flows, unsafe banks, melting ice or other factors that could be dangerous. However, flooding is not expected.
  • A yellow Flood Outlook Statement is an early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high wind or other conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams, lakeshore flooding or erosion.

ORANGE: An orange Flood Watch means flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services and individual landowners in flood-prone areas should prepare.

RED: A red Flood Warning means flooding is imminent or already occurring in specific watercourses or municipalities.

2. Be prepared

  • The first step to flood preparedness is knowing your risk level. Call an RVCA Resource Specialist to learn more about your property before flooding occurs.
  • Subscribe to RVCA’s flood messages for regular updates and advanced warning of an impending flood. You can also stay informed through the RVCA website or our Facebook and Twitter pages.
  • Learn about your municipality’s emergency plan: evacuation routes and locations for emergency shelters, as well as their sandbag program if they have one.
  • Plan and practice an evacuation route with your family.
  • Pack an emergency kit that can be accessed easily and carried quickly in case of evacuation; include any necessary medication, blankets, extra clothing and flashlights.
  • Install a battery powered sump pump that can work in a blackout.

Learn more from Environment Canada's detailed flood preparation guide.

Managing flood risks in the Rideau Valley

Conservation authorities have a broad mandate to protect their watersheds, which can include everything from tree planting to regulating development in the floodplain. Not surprisingly, many residents have questions about the role of conservation authorities in their lives, especially when it comes to floods.

Still have questions? Call us at 613-692-3571 or email .

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Contact Us

Address:
Rideau Valley Conservation Authority
3889 Rideau Valley Drive
Manotick, Ontario K4M 1A5

Phone:
613-692-3571, 1-800-267-3504

Email:

Hours:

Regular Hours: Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Member of: conservation ontario