Super User

Super User

March 19, 2019 – Despite some gradual snow melting over the last two weeks, the snowpack throughout the Rideau Valley Watershed remains above average so there is still a potential for above average flooding this spring across the Rideau Valley Watershed, especially in low lying areas which have flooded in the past. However, the current weather forecast until end of March is indicating that daytime temperatures with single digit highs and below zero conditions at night with very little precipitation, so no significant flooding is anticipated in the next week or so.  This could change if the forecast changes (i.e., significant rainfall or higher temperatures).

Water levels on lakes and flows in the streams are presently about normal for this time of year. Parks Canada staff who manage the water levels for the Rideau Canal have indicated that the levels will be maintained in the coming weeks to allow for water storage in the upper watershed lakes as the snowpack continues to melt.

City of Ottawa crews are continuing with their annual ice removal program on the Rideau River between Rideau Falls and Bronson Avenue. Ice blasting is now complete and City crews are busy with ice breaking activities (for more information: City of Ottawa information at 311).

With the changing levels that can be expected over the coming weeks, ice cover on lakes, ditches, local streams and rivers will continue to be unstable. Extreme caution should be exercised by everyone when near local waterbodies. Parents should inform their children of the risks and provide appropriate supervision.

As the temperatures continue to warm up, the potential for ice jams remains high in some local streams and rivers, as flows could quickly increase before the ice can melt. Residents are advised to monitor the river closely as spring progresses for signs of ice jams. RVCA staff will be monitoring conditions but we always welcome any unique observations from watershed residents.

There is also a concern for flooding along roadways due to current snow/ice build up on roadside ditches and some roads.

Residents in flood prone or low-lying areas, historically susceptible to flooding, should take the necessary precautions to protect their property, such as:

  • Ensuring sump pump is clear, in good working condition and has a backwater valve
  • Ensuring easy access to a portable backup generator and pump
  • Ensuring downspouts are clear and the outlet is at least 3 metres from the dwelling
  • Securing items that might float away as flows increase
  • Removing valuable items from basements or lower floors that could be subject to flooding
  • Keeping emergency phone numbers handy
  • Familiarizing yourself with your municipality’s Emergency Preparedness Plan

RVCA will continue to monitor conditions and will issue further statements when or if there is an indication that the situation can be expected to change significantly.


"Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is a partnership of municipalities within the Rideau Valley watershed created under the Conservation Authorities Act to deliver a range of programs in watershed management and natural resource conservation."

RVCA Watershed Conditions Statements:

  • Water Safety – High flows, unstable banks, melting ice or other factors that could be dangerous for recreational users such as anglers, canoeists, hikers, children, pets, etc. Flooding is not expected.
  • Flood Outlook – Early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts, calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high winds or other conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams and/or lakeshore flooding or erosion.
  • Flood Watch – Flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services and individuals in flood-prone areas should prepare.
  • Flood Warning – Flooding is imminent or already occurring in area watercourses.

March 19, 2019 – Despite some gradual snow melting over the last two weeks, the snowpack throughout the Rideau Valley Watershed remains above average so there is still a potential for above average flooding this spring across the Rideau Valley Watershed, especially in low lying areas which have flooded in the past. However, the current weather forecast until end of March is indicating that daytime temperatures with single digit highs and below zero conditions at night with very little precipitation, so no significant flooding is anticipated in the next week or so.  This could change if the forecast changes (i.e., significant rainfall or higher temperatures).

Water levels on lakes and flows in the streams are presently about normal for this time of year. Parks Canada staff who manage the water levels for the Rideau Canal have indicated that the levels will be maintained in the coming weeks to allow for water storage in the upper watershed lakes as the snowpack continues to melt.

City of Ottawa crews are continuing with their annual ice removal program on the Rideau River between Rideau Falls and Bronson Avenue. Ice blasting is now complete and City crews are busy with ice breaking activities (for more information: City of Ottawa information at 311).

With the changing levels that can be expected over the coming weeks, ice cover on lakes, ditches, local streams and rivers will continue to be unstable. Extreme caution should be exercised by everyone when near local waterbodies. Parents should inform their children of the risks and provide appropriate supervision.

As the temperatures continue to warm up, the potential for ice jams remains high in some local streams and rivers, as flows could quickly increase before the ice can melt. Residents are advised to monitor the river closely as spring progresses for signs of ice jams. RVCA staff will be monitoring conditions but we always welcome any unique observations from watershed residents.

There is also a concern for flooding along roadways due to current snow/ice build up on roadside ditches and some roads.

Residents in flood prone or low-lying areas, historically susceptible to flooding, should take the necessary precautions to protect their property, such as:

  • Ensuring sump pump is clear, in good working condition and has a backwater valve
  • Ensuring easy access to a portable backup generator and pump
  • Ensuring downspouts are clear and the outlet is at least 3 metres from the dwelling
  • Securing items that might float away as flows increase
  • Removing valuable items from basements or lower floors that could be subject to flooding
  • Keeping emergency phone numbers handy
  • Familiarizing yourself with your municipality’s Emergency Preparedness Plan

RVCA will continue to monitor conditions and will issue further statements when or if there is an indication that the situation can be expected to change significantly.


"Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is a partnership of municipalities within the Rideau Valley watershed created under the Conservation Authorities Act to deliver a range of programs in watershed management and natural resource conservation."

RVCA Watershed Conditions Statements:

  • Water Safety – High flows, unstable banks, melting ice or other factors that could be dangerous for recreational users such as anglers, canoeists, hikers, children, pets, etc. Flooding is not expected.
  • Flood Outlook – Early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts, calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high winds or other conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams and/or lakeshore flooding or erosion.
  • Flood Watch – Flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services and individuals in flood-prone areas should prepare.
  • Flood Warning – Flooding is imminent or already occurring in area watercourses.
March 15, 2019

Staff Directory

Main Office Phone Numbers : 613-692-3571 / 1-800-267-3504

Corporate Service

Chris Czerwinski, GIS Database Specialist
1172
Dave Crossman, GIS Coordinator
1160
Debra Innes, GIS Specialist
1190
Diane Downey, Director, Communications and Outreach and Executive Director, RVCF
1126
Gloria Toffolo, Receptionist
1100
Jan Gobey, Accounts Receivable Clerk
1125
John DeMorest, Systems Administrator
1121
Laurie Dool, Communications Coordinator
1139
Leann Thompson, Finance Assistant
1106
Léona Folusewych, Receptionist
1100
Michelle Paton, Executive Assistant
1177
Perry Ghioureliotis, GIS Database Specialist
1198
Rico Vipari, Human Resources Technician
1145
Sarah Wayne, Manager, Finance and Human Resources
1212
Sommer Casgrain-Robertson, General Manager / Secretary Treasurer
1214

Conservation Lands and Stewardship

Eric Butson, Forestry Technician
1120
Dan Cooper, Director, Conservation Lands and Stewardship
1124
Scott Danford, Forestry Program Manager
1175
Megan Dunster, Conservation Lands Technician
1179
Kristy Giles, Conservation Lands Planner (On Leave)
1178
Tim Gray, Field Operations Technician
613-489-3060
Brent Hughes, Manager, Conservation Lands
613-489-3060
Andrea Wood, Baxter Conservation Area Supervisor (Acting)
613-489-3592
Wayne Mackie, Field Operations Coordinator
613-489-3060
Derek Matheson, Rural Clean Water Program Manager
1134
Meaghan McDonald, Lake Planning / Shoreline Stewardship Coordinator
1192
Scott Muldoon, Field Operations Technician
613-489-3060
Shane Olive, RVCC Maintenance and Operations Technician
1196
Laura Parent, Stewardship Technician
1150
Cathy Sentner, Admin Assistant
1136
Rebecca Whitman, Foley Mountain Conservation Area Supervisor
613-273-3255
Andrea Wood, Baxter Conservation Area Supervisor (On Leave)
613-489-3592

Science and Planning

Adrienne Lewis, Aquatic Resource Technician
1157
Amanda Lange, Aquatic Resource Technician
1199
Chelsey Ellis, City Stream Watch Coordinator (On Leave)
1180
Emma Bennett, Resource Specialist (On Leave)
1132
Eric Lalande, Planner
1137
Glen McDonald, Director, Science and Planning
1133
Jamie Batchelor, Planner
1191
Jennifer Lamoureux, Aquatic and Fish Habitat Biologist
1108
Kellie Iacovitti, Records Administrator
1128
Martin Czarski, Watershed Ecologist
1163
Matt Jokiel, Resource Assistant
1132
Megan Peacock, Resource Specialist
1193
Mike Yee, Planner
1176
Phil Mosher, Planner
1181
Rosario Castanon-Escobar, City Stream Watch Coordinator (Acting)
1155
Sarah MacLeod-Nielson, Surface Water Quality Coordinator
1109

Engineering and Regulations

Adam Dillon, Regulations Inspector
1159
Andrea Larsen, Hydrometric Technician
1140
Brian Stratton, Manager of Engineering
1141
Claire Milloy, Groundwater Scientist
1217
Eric Kohlsmith, Upper Watershed Regulations Inspector
1153
Evelyn Liu, Water Resources Engineer
1104
Ferdous Ahmed, Senior Water Resources Engineer
1170
Greg Melvin, Surface Water Quality Coordinator (Acting)
1220
Hal Stimson, Compliance Technician
1127
Jason Hutton, Engineering Inspector
1152
Jennifer Galvin, Groundwater Intern
1168
John Garrah, Regulations Inspector
1215
Justin Robert, Groundwater GIS/Database Specialist
1194
Nick Recoskie, Erosion Control Technician
1189
Rosalind Kee, Administrative Assistant
1123
Shelley MacPherson, Regulations Enforcement Officer
1102
Terry Davidson, Director, Engineering and Regulations
1107
Tyler Bauman, Engineering Assistant
1154

Source Water Protection

Marika Livingston, Project Manager
1148

Rideau Valley Conservation Foundation

Diane Downey, Executive Director, RVCF and Director, Communications and Outreach
1126
March 12, 2019

Eric Butson

March 6, 2019 – The winter of 2018-19 has been an old-fashioned winter with lots of snow (over 250 cm to-date) and no significant thaw events. As such, the snowpack throughout the Rideau Valley Watershed is well above average. Current conditions at several RVCA snow course sites are indicating near record water content amounts in the snow for this time of year, generally not seen since the late 1970s. 

Based solely on the fact we have above average water content, there is a potential for above average flooding this spring across the Rideau Valley Watershed, especially in low lying areas which have flooded in the past. However, the two other key factors influencing actual flood conditions are precipitation and temperatures as we move through March and into April. The current short-term forecast does not indicate any significant precipitation or above-seasonal temperatures; however, we know the daily temperature will begin to increase as we move through March.

Water levels on lakes and flows in the streams are presently at or slightly below normal for this time of year. Parks Canada staff who manage the water levels for the Rideau Canal have indicated that the levels will be maintained or lowered in the coming weeks to allow for water storage in the upper watershed lakes once the snowpack starts to melt.

City of Ottawa crews have begun the annual ice removal program on the Rideau River between Rideau Falls and Bronson Avenue. Crews will work to keep the ice from reforming until the spring freshet occurs (for more information: City of Ottawa information at 311).

With the changing levels that can be expected over the coming weeks, ice cover on lakes, ditches, local streams and rivers will continue to be unstable. Extreme caution should be exercised by everyone when near local waterbodies. Parents should inform their children of the risks and provide appropriate supervision.  

As the temperatures start to warm up, there is also a concern for potential ice jams in local streams and rivers, as flows could quickly increase before the ice can melt. Residents are advised to monitor the river closely as spring progresses for signs of ice jams. RVCA staff will be monitoring conditions but we always welcome any unique observations from watershed residents.

There is also a concern for flooding along roadways due to current snow/ice build up on roadside ditches and some roads.

Residents in flood prone or low-lying areas, historically susceptible to flooding, should take the necessary precautions to protect their property, such as:

  • Ensuring sump pump is clear, in good working condition and has a backwater valve
  • Ensuring easy access to a portable backup generator and pump
  • Ensuring downspouts are clear and the outlet is at least 3 metres from the dwelling
  • Securing items that might float away as flows increase
  • Removing valuable items from basements or lower floors that could be subject to flooding
  • Keeping emergency phone numbers handy
  • Familiarizing yourself with your municipality’s Emergency Preparedness Plan

RVCA will continue to monitor conditions and will issue further statements when or if there is an indication that the situation can be expected to change significantly.


"Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is a partnership of municipalities within the Rideau Valley watershed created under the Conservation Authorities Act to deliver a range of programs in watershed management and natural resource conservation."

RVCA Watershed Conditions Statements:

  • Water Safety – High flows, unstable banks, melting ice or other factors that could be dangerous for recreational users such as anglers, canoeists, hikers, children, pets, etc. Flooding is not expected.
  • Flood Outlook – Early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts, calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high winds or other conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams and/or lakeshore flooding or erosion.
  • Flood Watch – Flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services and individuals in flood-prone areas should prepare.
  • Flood Warning – Flooding is imminent or already occurring in area watercourses.

March 6, 2019 – The winter of 2018-19 has been an old-fashioned winter with lots of snow (over 250 cm to-date) and no significant thaw events. As such, the snowpack throughout the Rideau Valley Watershed is well above average. Current conditions at several RVCA snow course sites are indicating near record water content amounts in the snow for this time of year, generally not seen since the late 1970s. 

Based solely on the fact we have above average water content, there is a potential for above average flooding this spring across the Rideau Valley Watershed, especially in low lying areas which have flooded in the past. However, the two other key factors influencing actual flood conditions are precipitation and temperatures as we move through March and into April. The current short-term forecast does not indicate any significant precipitation or above-seasonal temperatures; however, we know the daily temperature will begin to increase as we move through March.

Water levels on lakes and flows in the streams are presently at or slightly below normal for this time of year. Parks Canada staff who manage the water levels for the Rideau Canal have indicated that the levels will be maintained or lowered in the coming weeks to allow for water storage in the upper watershed lakes once the snowpack starts to melt.

City of Ottawa crews have begun the annual ice removal program on the Rideau River between Rideau Falls and Bronson Avenue. Crews will work to keep the ice from reforming until the spring freshet occurs (for more information: City of Ottawa information at 311).

With the changing levels that can be expected over the coming weeks, ice cover on lakes, ditches, local streams and rivers will continue to be unstable. Extreme caution should be exercised by everyone when near local waterbodies. Parents should inform their children of the risks and provide appropriate supervision.  

As the temperatures start to warm up, there is also a concern for potential ice jams in local streams and rivers, as flows could quickly increase before the ice can melt. Residents are advised to monitor the river closely as spring progresses for signs of ice jams. RVCA staff will be monitoring conditions but we always welcome any unique observations from watershed residents.

There is also a concern for flooding along roadways due to current snow/ice build up on roadside ditches and some roads.

Residents in flood prone or low-lying areas, historically susceptible to flooding, should take the necessary precautions to protect their property, such as:

  • Ensuring sump pump is clear, in good working condition and has a backwater valve
  • Ensuring easy access to a portable backup generator and pump
  • Ensuring downspouts are clear and the outlet is at least 3 metres from the dwelling
  • Securing items that might float away as flows increase
  • Removing valuable items from basements or lower floors that could be subject to flooding
  • Keeping emergency phone numbers handy
  • Familiarizing yourself with your municipality’s Emergency Preparedness Plan

RVCA will continue to monitor conditions and will issue further statements when or if there is an indication that the situation can be expected to change significantly.


"Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is a partnership of municipalities within the Rideau Valley watershed
created under the Conservation Authorities Act to deliver a range of programs in watershed management and
natural resource conservation."

RVCA Watershed Conditions Statements:

  • Water Safety – High flows, unstable banks, melting ice or other factors that could be dangerous for recreational users such as anglers, canoeists, hikers, children, pets, etc. Flooding is not expected.
  • Flood Outlook – Early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts, calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high winds or other conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams and/or lakeshore flooding or erosion.
    Flood Watch – Flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services and individuals in flood-prone areas should prepare.
    Flood Warning – Flooding is imminent or already occurring in area watercourses.

The Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is the lead inter-municipal agency working to address river-related environmental issues and concerns within the Rideau Valley watershed. It’s our job to make sure that the water is looked after by everyone in today’s society so that tomorrow’s generations inherit a clean, healthy, functioning watershed. In co-operation with the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority, we operate the Mississippi-Rideau Septic Office which is responsible for sewage system application evaluation and processing, site visits, permit issuance, follow-up, records management and reporting and public relations.


Reporting to the Inspector, you will assist with the organization and implementation of the septic re-inspection program for three townships in south eastern Ontario.  You will mainly conduct inspections of on-site wastewater systems with some office responsibilities such as data entry, file management and responding to enquiries from the public.

As the ideal candidate, you are a post-secondary student in an Environmental Engineering program. You are familiar with and interested in water/wastewater treatment technologies.  You can manipulate and analyze data using standard software packages (such as Microsoft Excel and GIS) and are able to read and interpret technical plans and documents.  You have excellent verbal and written communication skills in English. You are as comfortable working in an office environment as you are in the field. The physically demanding work requires that you are able to navigate unstable terrain and lift up to 50 lbs. You don’t mind working in adverse weather conditions like heat and rain and you are comfortable working on and around water. You must hold a valid Class G2 or better driver’s license and be able to provide an acceptable driving record.

If you have a strong commitment to the environment and the protection of land and water resources and you meet the requirements of this position, please submit your resume by March 29, 2019.

If submitting your application by e-mail, in the subject line please indicate the program in which you are enrolled, your year of study and the year you will graduate.

Download the Job Advertisement

The Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is an equal opportunity employer. The Rideau Valley Conservation Authority is an equal opportunity employer. We welcome all applications; however, we will contact only those candidates selected for consideration.  We are committed to providing accommodations for people with disabilities. If you are selected for an interview and you require an accommodation, we will work with you to meet your needs.

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Contact Us

Address:
Rideau Valley Conservation Authority
3889 Rideau Valley Drive
Manotick, Ontario K4M 1A5

Phone:
613-692-3571, 1-800-267-3504

Email:
info@rvca.ca

Hours:

Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Member of: conservation ontario